Archivos Mensuales: marzo 2018

Simulation on Physical Systems

I take a long time writing many post about the simulation. Main reason is because I have learned for many years the value of using computers for physical system analysis. Without these tools, I would never be able to get reliable results, because of the amount of calculations I would have to do. Modern simulators, able to solve complex calculations using the computers capacity, allow us to get a more realistic behavior for a complex system, knowing its structures. Physics and Engineering work every day with simulations to get better predictions and take decisions. In this post, I am going to show what are the most important parts we should be kept in mind about the simulation.

In 1982, physicist Richard Feynman published an article where he talked about the analysis of physical systems using computers (1). In those years, computer technology had progressed to a high level that it was possible to achieve a greater calculation capacity. New programming languages worked with complex formulas, such as FORTRAN, and allowed the calculations on systems by complex integro-differential equations, which resolution usually needed numerical methods. So, in those first years, physicists began to do simulations with programs able to solve the constitutive system equations, although not always with simple descriptions.

A great step forward in electronics was the SPICE program, at the beginning of 70s (2). This program, FORTRAN-based, was able to compute non-linear electronic circuits, removing the radiation effects, and solve the time-domain integral-differential equations. Over the years, the Berkeley’s SPICE became the first reference on simulation programs and its success being such that almost all the simulation programs developed along last years have its base on the Nagel and Pederson algorithms, developed in 70s.

From 80s, and searching to solve three-dimensional problems, the method of moments (MoM) was developed. It was come to solve systems raised as integral equations in the boundaries (3), being very popular. It was used in Fluid Mechanics, Acoustic Waves and Electromagnetism. Today, this one is still used to solve two-dimensional electromagnetic structures.

But the algorithms have got a huge progress, with the emergence of new finite element methods (FEM, frequency-domain) and time-domain finite differences (FDTD, time-domain) in 90s, based on the resolution of systems formulated by differential equations, important benchmarks on the generation of new algorithms able to solve complex systems (4). And with these new advances, the simulation contribution in Physics came to take spectacular dimensions.

WHAT IS THE VALUE OF AN ACCURATE MODEL?

When we are studying any physical phenomenon, we usually invoke a model. Whether an isolated phenomenon or within an environment, whether in Acoustic Waves, Electromagnetism or Quantum Mechanics, having a well-characterized model is essential to get its behavior, in terms of its variables. Using an accurate model increases our certainty on the results.

However, modeling is complex. It is needed to know what are the relationships between variables and from here, determine a formulation system that defines the behavior within a computer.

A model example is a piezoelectric material. In Electronics, piezoelectric materials are commonly used as resonators and it is usually to see these electronic devices (quartz or any other resonant material based on this property).

A piezoelectric model, very successful in the 40s, was developed by Mason (5). Thanks to the similarity between the Electromagnetic and Acoustic waves, he got to join both properties using transmission lines, based in the telegraphist’s equations, writing the constitutive equations. In this way, he developed a piezoelectric model which is still used today. This model can be seen in Fig. 1 and it has already been studied in previous posts.

Fig.1 - Mason Model

Fig.1 – Modelo de piezoeléctrico de Mason

This model practically solved the small signal analysis in frequency domain, getting an impedance resonance trace as it is shown in Fig. 2

Fig.2 – Resultados del análisis del modelo de Mason

However, the models need to expand their predictive capacity.

The Mason model describes the piezoelectric behavior rightly when we are working in a linear mode. But it has faults when we need to know the large signal behavior. So new advances in the piezoelectric material studies included the non-linear relationships in its constitutive equations (6).

Fig. 3 – Modelo tridimensional de una inducción

In three-dimensional models, we must know well what are the characteristics that define the materials to have an optimal results. In the induction shown in Fig. 3, CoFeHfO is being used as a magnetic material. It has a frequency-dependent complex magnetic permeability that must be defined in the libraries.

The results will be better as the model is defined better, and this is the fundamental Physicist task: getting a reliable model from the studies on the phenomena and the materials.

The way to extract a model is usually done by direct measurement or through the derived magnitudes, using equations systems. With a right model definition, the simulation results will be more reliable.

ANALYSIS USING SIMULATION

Once the model is rightly defined, we can perform an analysis by simulation. In this case, we will study the H-field inside the inductor, at 200 MHz, using the FEM analysis, and we are going to draw this one, being shown in Fig. 4.

Fig. 4 – Excitación magnética en el interior del inductor

The result is drawn in a vector mode, since we have chosen that representation to see the H-field direction inside the inductor. We can verify, first, that the maximum H-field is inside the inductor, to the positive section on Y axis in the upper area, while in the lower part the orientation the inverse. The maximum H-field level obtained is 2330 A/m with 1 W excitation between the inductor electrodes.

The behavior is precisely that of an induction whose value can also be estimated by calculating its impedance and drawiing it on Smith’s chart, Fig. 5.

Fig. 5 – Impedancia del inductor sobre carta de Smith

The Smith’s chart trace clearly shows an inductive impedance, which value decreases when the frequency increases, because of losses of the CoFeHfO magnetic material. Besides, these losses contribute to the resistance increasing with frequency. There will be a maximum Q in the useful band

Fig. 6 – Factor de calidad del inductor

Having a induction with losses a quality factor Q, we can draw it as a function of the frequency in Fig. 6.

Therefore, with the FEM simulation we have been able to analyze the physical parameters on a modeled structure that would have cost us much more time and effort to get by means of complex calculations and equations. This shows, as Feynman pointed out in that 1982 conference, the simulation powerful when there are accurate models and proper software to perform these analyzes.

However, the simulation has not always had the chance to get the best results. Precisely is the previous step, the importance of having an accurate model, which faithfully defines the physical behavior of any structure, which will ensure the reliability of the results.

EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS

The best way to check if the simulation is valid is to resort getting experimental results. Fortunately, the simulation performed on the previous inductor is got from (7), and, in this reference, the authors show experimental results that validate the results of the inductor model. In Fig. 7 and 8 we can see the inductance and resistance values, and adding the quality factor, can be compared with the experimental results of the authors.

Fig. 7 – Valor de la inductancia en función de la frecuencia

Fig. 8 – Valor de la resistencia efectiva en función de la frecuencia

The results obtained by the authors, using HFSS for the simulation of the inductor, can be seen in Fig. 9. The authors have done the simulation on the structure with and without core, and show the simulation against the experimental result . Seeing the graphs, it can be concluded that the results got in the simulation have a high level of concordance with those obtained through the experimental measurements.

This shows us that the simulation is effective when the model is reliable, and that a model is accurate when the results obtained through the simulation converge with the experimental results. In this way, we have a powerful analysis tool that will allow us to know in advance the behavior of a structure and make decisions before moving on to the prototyping process.

Fig. 9 – Resultados experimentales

In any case, convergence is also important in a simulation. The FEM simulation needs that the mesh is so accurate as getting a good convergence. A low convergence level gives results far from the optimum, and very complex structures require a lot of processing speed, a high RAM use and, sometimes, must even perform a simulation on several processors. To more complex structures, the simulation time increases considerably, and that is one of its main disadvantages.

Although the FEM simulators allow the optimization of the values ​​and even today the integration with other simulators, they are still simulators that require, due to the complexity of the calculations to be carried out, powerful computers that allow to make those calculations with reliability.

CONCLUSIONS

Once again, we agree with Feynman when, in that 1982 seminar, he chose precisely a topic which seemed to have no interest for the audience. Since that publication, Feynman’s article has become a classic of Physics publications. The experience that I have got over the years with several simulators, shows me that the way opened by them will have a considerable advance when quantum computers are a reality and their processing speed raises, allowing that these tools get reliable results in a short space of time.

The simulation in the physical systems has been an important progress to get results without needing to realize previous prototypes and supposes an important saving in the research and development costs.

REFERENCES

  1. Feynman, R; “Simulating Physics with Computers”; International Journal of Theoretical Physics, 1982, Vols. 21, Issue 6-7, pp. 467-488, DOI: 10.1007/BF02650179.
  2. Nagel, Laurence W. and Pederson, D.O. “SPICE (Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis)”, EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley, 1973, UCB/ERL M382.
  3. Gibson, Walton C., “The Method of Moments in Electromagnetics”, Segunda Edición, CRC Press, 2014, ISBN: 978-1-4822-3579-1.
  4. Reddy, J.N, “An Introduction to the Finite Element Method”, Segunda Edición,  McGraw-Hill, 1993, ISBN: 0-07-051355-4.
  5. Mason, Warren P., “Electromechanical Transducers and Wave Filters”, Segunda Edición, Van Nostrand Reinhold Inc., 1942, ISBN: 978-0-4420-5164-8.
  6. Dong, S. Shim and Feld, David A., “A General Nonlinear Mason Model of Arbitrary Nonlinearities in a Piezoelectric Film”, IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium Proceedings, 2010, pp. 295-300.
  7. Li, LiangLiang, et al. 4, “Small-Resistance and High-Quality-Factor Magnetic Integrated Inductors on PCB”, IEEE Transactions on Advanced Packaging, Vol. 32, pp. 780-787, November 2009, DOI: 10.1109/TADVP.2009.2019845.
Anuncios

La importancia de la simulación en los sistemas físicos

Dedico muchas entradas de este blog a la simulación. Esto es debido a que a lo largo de los años he aprendido de la importancia del uso de computadores para el estudio y análisis de sistemas, circuitos y estructuras que, sin estas herramientas, no lograría a priori reproducir, debido a la cantidad de cálculos que hay que realizar. Los modernos simuladores, que son capaces de resolver cuestiones complejas gracias a la capacidad de cálculo de los computadores, nos permiten evaluar el comportamiento de un sistema complejo a través de la definición de las estructuras. Varias disciplinas de la Física y la Ingeniería recurren de forma habitual a la simulación para realizar sus cálculos previos y poder tomar decisiones y elecciones. En esta entrada deseo mostrar cuáles son las partes más importantes que se deben tener en cuenta a la hora de simular.

En el año 1982, Richard Feynman publicó un artículo en el que hablaba del análisis de los sistemas físicos a través de computadores (1). En aquellos años, la tecnología de los computadores había avanzando a un nivel tan alto que era posible conseguir una mayor capacidad de procesado. La generación de lenguajes de programación que pudiesen contener fórmulas complejas, como FORTRAN, permitía el cálculo y evaluación de sistemas que estuviesen definidos por complejas ecuaciones integro-diferenciales, cuya resolución en muchas ocasiones requería de métodos numéricos. De este modo, en los primeros años, los físicos podían hacer simulaciones a través de programas capaces de resolver las ecuaciones constitutivas del sistema, aunque no siempre con descripciones sencillas.

En el caso de la electrónica, la simulación de circuitos tuvo su principal baluarte en SPICE, a principios de los años 70 (2). El programa, basado en FORTRAN, era capaz de simular circuitos electrónicos no lineales, sin tener en cuenta los efectos de radiación, y resolver las complejas ecuaciones integro-diferenciales en el dominio del tiempo. Con los años, el SPICE de Berkeley se convirtió en la referencia absoluta de los programas de simulación, siendo su éxito tal que casi todos los simuladores desarrollados en los últimos años basan gran parte de sus algoritmos en los desarrollados por Nagel y Pederson en los años 70.

A partir de los 80, y buscando resolver problemas tridimensionales, fue muy popular el método de los momentos (MoM), que era capaz de resolver sistemas que han sido planteados como ecuaciones integrales en los límites (3). Fue de aplicación en mecánica de fluidos, acústica y electromagnetismo. Hoy en día el método se sigue utilizando para resolver problemas electromagnéticos en dos dimensiones.

Pero sin duda los algoritmos y los métodos han ido avanzando, apareciendo en los 90 los métodos de elementos finitos (FEM, para el dominio de la frecuencia) y de diferencias finitas en el dominio del tiempo (FDTD, para el dominio del tiempo), basados en la resolución de sistemas formulados por ecuaciones diferenciales, referencias importantes dentro una explosión de algoritmos destinados a la resolución de sistemas complejos (4). Y con estos avances, la contribución de la simulación al mundo de la Física cobra dimensiones espectaculares.

LA IMPORTANCIA DE UN BUEN MODELO

Cuando se estudia un fenómeno, en Física recurrimos habitualmente a trasladar ese fenómeno a un modelo. Se trate de un fenómeno aislado o dentro de un entorno, sea en Acústica, Electromagnetismo o Mecánica Cuántica, tener bien caracterizado un modelo es esencial para poder determinar el comportamiento del fenómeno en función de sus variables y de las relaciones entre ellas. Con un modelo adecuado aumenta nuestra certidumbre en los resultados.

Sin embargo, modelar es complejo. Hay que conocer cuáles son las relaciones entre las variables y a partir de ahí, establecer un sistema que reproduzca el comportamiento dentro de un computador.

Un ejemplo de modelo es el material piezoeléctrico. En Electrónica, los materiales piezoeléctricos son de uso común y es habitual ver dispositivos electrónicos que contengan cristales de cuarzo o cualquier otro material resonante basado en esta propiedad.

Un modelo de piezoeléctrico que tuvo mucho éxito en los años 40 fue el desarrollado por Mason (5). Gracias a la similitud entre los campos electromagnéticos y los acústicos, combinó ambas propiedades a través de líneas de transmisión definidas por las ecuaciones del telegrafista, extraídas de las ecuaciones constitutivas. De este modo desarrolló un modelo para el material piezoeléctrico que hoy en día se sigue utilizando. El modelo se puede ver en la Fig. 1 y ya se estudió en entradas anteriores.

Fig.1 – Modelo de piezoeléctrico de Mason

Este modelo resolvía prácticamente el análisis en frecuencia del material en pequeña señal, obteniendo la curva de resonancia en la impedancia que presentan habitualmente este tipo de componentes y que se puede ver en la Fig. 2

Fig.2 – Resultados del análisis del modelo de Mason

Sin embargo, los modelos necesitan evolucionar y ampliar su capacidad predictiva.

El modelo de Mason describe correctamente el comportamiento del piezoeléctrico cuando trabaja en forma lineal. Sin embargo, falla cuando se quiere conocer el comportamiento cuando se aplica un potencial intenso entre sus electrodos. Así que nuevos avances en el comportamiento del material llevaron a incluir el comportamiento no lineal en las ecuaciones constitutivas (6).

Fig. 3 – Modelo tridimensional de una inducción

En el caso de los modelos tridimensionales, hay que conocer bien cuáles son las características que definen a los materiales para tener un resultado óptimo. En el caso de la inducción de la Fig. 3, se está utilizando como material magnético CoFeHfO, con una permeabilidad magnética compleja dependiente de la frecuencia que hay que introducir en la librería de materiales.

Los resultados serán mejores cuanto mejor esté definido el modelo, y esa es la labor primordial del Físico: obtener modelos fiables a partir de los estudios realizados sobre los fenómenos y los materiales.

La forma de extraer el modelo suele realizarse mediante la medición directa de sus parámetros fundamentales o bien a través de las magnitudes derivadas, en forma de sistemas de ecuaciones. Con una correcta definición del modelo, los resultados obtenidos a través de la simulación serán fiables.

ANÁLISIS MEDIANTE SIMULACIÓN

Una vez se tiene correctamente definido el modelo, podemos realizar el análisis mediante simulación. En este caso, vamos a estudiar la excitación magnética H que se obtiene a 200 MHz en el inductor, usando el análisis FEM, y representando la excitación magnética en el interior de la inducción. La Fig. 4 nos muestra esa excitación magnética.

Fig. 4 -Excitación magnética en el interior del inductor

El resultado obtenido se representa de forma vectorial, ya que hemos elegido esa representación para ver el sentido de la excitación magnética en el espacio. Podemos comprobar, primero, que la excitación magnética máxima se produce en el interior del inductor, y que en su parte superior la orientación es hacia la zona positiva de eje Y, mientras que en la parte inferior la orientación es a la inversa. El nivel máximo de campo obtenido es de 2330 A/m para una excitación de 1 W entre los extremos del inductor.

El comportamiento observado es precisamente el de una inducción cuyo valor puede también ser estimado calculando su impedancia y representándola sobre la carta de Smith, Fig. 5.

Fig. 5 – Impedancia del inductor sobre carta de Smith

La curva mostrada en la carta de Smith muestra claramente una impedancia inductiva, cuyo valor va disminuyendo cuando aumenta la frecuencia, debido a las pérdidas del material magnético CoFeHfO utilizado. Estas pérdidas, además, contribuyen a que la resistencia aumente con la frecuencia. Habrá un Q máximo en la banda útil

Fig. 6 – Factor de calidad del inductor

Como una inducción con resistencia de pérdidas tiene un factor de calidad Q, representamos éste en función de la frecuencia en la Fig. 6.

Por tanto, con la simulación FEM hemos logrado analizar parámetros físicos en una estructura que nos hubiese costado mucho más tiempo y esfuerzo reproducir mediante complejos cálculos y ecuaciones. Esto demuestra, tal y como Feynman apuntó en aquella conferencia de 1982, el potencial que la simulación proporciona cuando se tienen buenos modelos y un software adecuado para poder realizar estos análisis.

Sin embargo, la simulación no ha tenido siempre las de ganar. Precisamente es el paso anterior, la importancia de tener un buen modelo que reproduzca fielmente el comportamiento físico de una estructura, el que nos va a garantizar la fiabilidad de los resultados.

RESULTADOS EXPERIMENTALES

El mejor modo de comprobar si la simulación es válida es recurrir a obtener resultados experimentales. Afortunadamente, la simulación realizada sobre el inductor está obtenida de (7), y en esta referencia los autores muestran resultados experimentales que validan los resultados del modelo obtenido. En las Fig. 7 y 8 podemos ver los valores de inductancia y resistencia obtenidas, que junto con el factor de calidad, pueden ser comparadas con los resultados experimentales que los autores indican en su artículo.

Fig. 7 – Valor de la inductancia en función de la frecuencia

Fig. 8 – Valor de la resistencia efectiva en función de la frecuencia

Los resultados obtenidos por los autores, que han usado HFSS para hacer la simulación del inductor, se pueden ver en la Fig. 9. Los autores han hecho la simulación sobre la estructura sin núcleo y con núcleo, y representan la simulación frente al resultado experimental. De las gráficas presentadas se puede concluir que los resultados obtenidos en la simulación tienen un alto nivel de concordancia con los obtenidos mediante las medidas experimentales.

Esto nos demuestra que la simulación es efectiva cuando el modelo es fiable, y que un modelo es fiable cuando los resultados obtenidos a través de la simulación convergen con los resultados experimentales. De este modo, tenemos una potente herramienta de análisis que nos permitirá conocer de antemano el comportamiento de una estructura y tomar decisiones antes de pasar al proceso de prototipado.

Fig. 9 – Resultados experimentales

En todo caso, en la simulación es importante también la convergencia. La simulación FEM requiere que el mallado que se realice sobre la estructura sea tan eficaz como para hacer converger las soluciones. Un bajo nivel de convergencia da resultados alejados del óptimo, y estructuras muy complejas requieren de mucha velocidad de procesado, mucha memoria RAM e incluso en ocasiones realizar una simulación sobre varios procesadores. A estructuras más complejas, el tiempo de simulación aumenta considerablemente, y esa es una de sus principales desventajas.

Aunque los simuladores FEM permiten la optimización de los valores e incluso hoy la integración con otros simuladores, siguen siendo simuladores que requieren, por la complejidad de los cálculos a realizar, computadores potentes que permitan hacer esos cálculos con fiabilidad.

CONCLUSIONES

Una vez más damos la razón a Feynman cuando en aquel seminario de 1982 eligió precisamente un tema que parecía que no tenía interés ninguno para los asistentes. Desde la publicación de esa charla, el artículo de Feynman se ha convertido en un clásico de las publicaciones de Física. La experiencia que he adquirido a lo largo de los años con simuladores de casi todos los tipos me indica que el camino abierto por éstos sufrirá un avance considerable cuando los computadores cuánticos sean una realidad, y la velocidad de procesado que se pueda obtener permitan a estas herramientas obtener resultados fiables en un corto espacio de tiempo.

La simulación en los sistemas físicos ha sido un avance considerable para poder conseguir resultados sin necesidad de realizar prototipos previos y supone un importante ahorro en los costes de investigación y desarrollo.

REFERENCIAS

  1. Feynman, R; “Simulating Physics with Computers”; International Journal of Theoretical Physics, 1982, Vols. 21, Issue 6-7, pp. 467-488, DOI: 10.1007/BF02650179.
  2. Nagel, Laurence W. and Pederson, D.O. “SPICE (Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis)”, EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley, 1973, UCB/ERL M382.
  3. Gibson, Walton C., “The Method of Moments in Electromagnetics”, Segunda Edición, CRC Press, 2014, ISBN: 978-1-4822-3579-1.
  4. Reddy, J.N, “An Introduction to the Finite Element Method”, Segunda Edición,  McGraw-Hill, 1993, ISBN: 0-07-051355-4.
  5. Mason, Warren P., “Electromechanical Transducers and Wave Filters”, Segunda Edición, Van Nostrand Reinhold Inc., 1942, ISBN: 978-0-4420-5164-8.
  6. Dong, S. Shim and Feld, David A., “A General Nonlinear Mason Model of Arbitrary Nonlinearities in a Piezoelectric Film”, IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium Proceedings, 2010, pp. 295-300.
  7. Li, LiangLiang, et al. 4, “Small-Resistance and High-Quality-Factor Magnetic Integrated Inductors on PCB”, IEEE Transactions on Advanced Packaging, Vol. 32, pp. 780-787, November 2009, DOI: 10.1109/TADVP.2009.2019845.